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Mar

04

Health Care Digital Marketing: Be Updated with Google Updates


Healthcare SEO means more than just incorporating every keyword you want to rank for on your website. You need to ensure that the keywords are read naturally as Google counts readability as an SEO factor. Also, you need to take steps like optimizing the code on your site and generating quality backlinks through Link Building Services & Packages: 100% Editorial White-Hat Backlinks pointing to your site to increase your search credibility.

Also, you need to spend time thinking about which keywords are more likely to drive traffic to your site. Think about the intent of the user landing on your site. When looking for a doctor who could treat a problem they have, would they search something like “knee replacement surgery” or would they look for information about “knee injuries”? That’s hard to say until you do the research.

Read also: Healthcare Marketing Strategy – Be Seen On Bing

Digital Marketing for Healthcare Businesses

Optimizing your website for the search engines is not something you can do in a day. It takes a whole lot of time.

In fact, search engine optimization is a slow process. Google won’t easily see the changes you’ve made to your website and will promote you to the top of the search engines. It can take months for the needle to start moving significantly in terms of visibility.

Also, healthcare SEO is not a one-time process. Optimizing your website for the search engines takes work. You need to keep publishing content or update the content you already have, as well as optimize local directories.

There are faster ways to get your website visible in search engines. Paid search results are a way to get people to click on your brand and they will show up instantly.

SEO for your healthcare website requires a lot of work and time. We don’t recommend doing this yourself or hiring an amateur to improve your SEO. SEO is changing every day as Google changes its algorithms. Experts keep up with what’s new and know how to optimize for Google’s ever-changing standards.

Pay attention to Google updates

Google’s 2018 “Medic” update was a major algorithm change affecting healthcare rankings. While Google shared little about the specifics of this update, about 40% of the affected websites belonged to the healthcare niche (hence the nickname “Medic”).

The Medic update is all about EAT (Expertise, Authority, and Trust). Simply put, Google places a high value on the trustworthiness of healthcare content that affects people’s well-being. To build trust with Google, your website should showcase your testimonials and provide accurate information about treatments and services.

The Medic Update

The update appeared to focus on healthcare-related sites, so much so that US SEO expert and trade journalist Barry Schwartz dubbed the algorithm change the Medic update. The name was quickly established, even if, according to Google, the impact on health sites was more of a coincidence and not a specific goal of the Medic update.

Schwartz conducted a survey of site operators and found that sites with medical or health and wellness topics were particularly affected. Google’s update made no distinction between blogs, medical specialist sites, clinics or e-commerce sites. According to Schwartz’s survey, 42 percent, ie almost half of all affected sites, came from this area. E-commerce accounted for the second-largest share at 16 percent. Business sites came third with 10.8 percent, followed by finance websites with 7.3 percent.

Several aspects of this update were noteworthy. First of all, Google rolled out the update worldwide, i.e. across all language and cultural regions. The SEO expert Marie Haynes assessed the situation similarly. She pointed out that the update was aimed at so-called YMYL pages (Your Money, Your Life). These sites deal extensively with finance, insurance, health, wellness, medical treatments, and the like.

The two SEO experts pointed out that Google had never released an update that was limited to individual market niches. For certain site operators, the consequences would be drastic. Barry Schwartz reported ranking losses of up to 60 percent.

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